FAQ

PEXA Settlement FAQ

The Section 32 Vendors Statement, also known as the Vendor's Statement or Vendor Statement must be prepared by or on behalf of the vendor of real estate, and served on any person who wishes to purchase the vendor's property before the sale contract is signed. There are serious consequences for the vendor if this procedure is not followed.

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Section 32 Vendor Statement FAQ

The Section 32 Vendors Statement, also known as the Vendor's Statement or Vendor Statement must be prepared by or on behalf of the vendor of real estate, and served on any person who wishes to purchase the vendor's property before the sale contract is signed. There are serious consequences for the vendor if this procedure is not followed.

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Auctions – Tricks & Strategies

There is something wrong with real estate auctions. Informed consumers hate them, industry commentators condemn them, and governments have failed to legitimise them. This article will help consumers to understand what is wrong with auctions, and what steps they can take to protect themselves in auction situations.

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Conveyancing Settlement FAQ

Settlement is the final stage in the conveyancing transaction. The parties' lawyers and lenders usually appoint professional settlement agencies to attend settlement on their behalf, to check and exchange documents and cheques. When everyone at settlement is satisfied with the exchange, the matter is declared 'settled'

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Lawyer and Client Contact FAQ

The provision of legal services can be very labour-intensive, and lawyers have traditionally charged on the basis of time spent on a client's matter. One client may require only one hour of the lawyer's time for a particular task, while another client may require three hours for the very same task. On this basis the lawyer is paid for the full four hours spent on the same task performed for the two clients.

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Conveyancing Costs FAQ

The provision of legal services can be very labour-intensive, and lawyers have traditionally charged on the basis of time spent on a client's matter. One client may require only one hour of the lawyer's time for a particular task, while another client may require three hours for the very same task. On this basis the lawyer is paid for the full four hours spent on the same task performed for the two clients.

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